For many Texans, attending sporting events always carries the memory of standing for the national anthem. Many even opt to put their hand on their heart. But since Colin Kaepernick made headlines by kneeling during the anthem in protest of the unfair treatment of Black Americans, this has become a hot topic. 

Back in February, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick and a group of Conservative leaders introduced SB 4, or the Star-Spangled Banner Protection Act. Patrick said it was a one of their "legislative priorities." This move was catalyzed by Dallas Mavericks' owner Mark Cuban's decision to stop playing the U.S. National Anthem prior to games.

It is also important to note that previously Cuban had supported his players who'd chosen to kneel in protest of racial inequality when the anthem had been played in the past.

Cuban's decision to stop playing the National Anthem before the start of games didn't sit well with Texan Conservative leaders. 

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Fox 29 reported that Cuban had expressed his support for the national anthem, generally. But at the same time Cuban said he and other top execs for the Dallas Mavericks “also loudly hear the voices of those who feel that the anthem does not represent them.”

Regardless, Lt. Governor Patrick and other Conservatives felt strongly about SB 4. And now, the Star-Spangled Protection Act has passed in the Texas Senate. Even 10 of the 13 Democrats in the Texas State Senate supported it alongside the 18 Conservatives. Next step? It has to pass in the Texas House of Representatives.

If it passes the House and is signed by Governor Abbott, it will mean it will be required by law that all professional sports teams in Texas who have contracts with the state government play the National Anthem at the start of their games.

Your thoughts, South Texas?

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