IT'S TIME FOR THE 47TH ANNUAL TEXAS RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL

It's that time of year again!  It's the 47th year of the Texas Renaissance Festival opening this Saturday morning.  This year's festival will be open on weekends from Saturday, October 9th thru Sunday, November 28th and they will also be open the Friday after Thanksgiving. Just in case you didn't know the Texas Renaissance Festival is the nation’s largest Renaissance event. Each year, over 450,000 patrons enter through the gates of the festival into a 16th Century European Village. There is shopping and food including those delicious Turkey Legs.

EVERY WEEKEND HAS A DIFFERENT THEME:

The first them of the festival this weekend is Oktoberfest! Journey back in time to old
Bavaria as the King and Queen open the festival season with a celebration of the best of the wurst (and the bier)!

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NEXT WEEKEND:

1001 Dreams will run from Saturday, Oct. 16 Sunday, Oct. 17. Enjoy Fairies, elves, and other fanciful creatures that bring enchantment to the lanes of New Market Village. Don’t forget to bring your best fairy wings!

Get the full list of weekend themes by clicking here. With so much to do at this year's TRR be sure you visit their website for more information and for tickets.

Just in case you have never been, check out the TRR by the numbers! It is impressive.

THE TEXAS RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL BY THE NUMBERS:
• 500,000+ guests annually
• 80,000 turkey legs cooked
• 50,000 campers annually
• 2,500 employees
• 1,000+ performers
• 400 shoppes
• 231 acres of camping facilities
• 200 daily performances
• 70 acres of Festival grounds
• 47 years open
• 20+ stages
• 17 days of the festival
• 8 themed weekends
• 1 king

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